Deena Bosch talks about her time with SCAT and Ditikeni

Posted on Nov 18, 2020 in News, Press Releases

This year has certainly had no shortage of crises and challenges that it has thrown at us. But over the past few months we have been able to share with you the many stories of ordinary men and women who have decided they must do something, to help people in need. We sat down with one of the Trustees of the Social Change Assistance Trust (and Ditikeni Board Member) Deena Bosch to talk about the work done by SCAT-supported local development agencies.

 

  1. Deena, we have enjoyed reading and sharing the stories of passion and commitment from SCAT this year on our social media pages. What emotion does it evoke in you, when you read all these amazing stories?

 

I know that community based organisations are finding it very hard to do the development work that is necessary in the country. I feel humbled by the efforts and all the energy that the SCAT team of organisations have put in. A lot of these stories showed work that was done during our national disaster period. This has been a period in which many people have gone through extreme hunger, and our public health care system has been struggling to look after people. The stories you read (in the SCAT booklet) are of local development agencies that have been really at the coalface of looking after communities in need, dealing with people and their emergencies. I am humbled and I am proud to see the work that they have done, especially if you think how difficult the circumstances are that they are working under.

 

  1. And considering how many problems we are facing currently – it must be overwhelming to see how many ordinary people are just deciding that they simply cannot sit back anymore and do nothing. They have to find a way of making some kind of contribution and getting involved.

 

In every community there are people who do the work, that allows for people in the country who have more than what they immediately need, to be able to contribute. And it is often the strong women in rural communities who step up to do the necessary and who do the emergency work that needs to be done.

 

  1. What drives you and what motivates you – on a personal level – to keep on doing the work you are doing in the NGO and NPO space, especially when we face difficult times as we have done this year?

 

I think it is the schooling we went through during all the years of fighting the injustices of the system of apartheid. I had parents who were also involved in the anti-apartheid struggle. I think it is a matter of being a committed social justice activist, which has become even more crucial after we fought all those long years for the achievement of a better future but now we see the damage that rampant corruption is doing to those dreams we had.

 

  1. What do you see as the biggest responsibility and target for the NGO and NPO sector in the year ahead?

 

People think 2020 was tough – I think 2021 is going to be even tougher. In the year ahead I think the main targets will be for organisations such as Ditikeni to raise more investment opportunities for NGOs and NPOs around the country, and for bodies such as SCAT to act as conduits to make sure the financial resources reach the people that are in desperate need. And then ultimately we must make sure that we all work responsibly with these funds that are generated.

 

  1. In closing, what is your message to ordinary South Africans?

 

Please find an organisation in your community that you can support, even if it is just with a monthly debit order of R200. You can also get in touch with the SCAT team to find any of the hard working local development agencies across our country that need your help.  You can get in touch with us by calling 021 418 2575 or visit our website www.scat.org.za